• floaters

  • blurred vision

  • dark spots in the central vision

  • difficulty seeing in dim lighting

  • distorted vision

  • affected color perception 

Treatment and Prevention

Treatment may vary from person to person depending on the severity of the condition. Patients may need laser surgery to help slow down the leakage of fluid in the eye by sealing off damaged blood vessels. Your ophthalmologist may opt to inject medication into the eye to slow down the leakage of fluid and stop the formation of new blood vessels. In advanced cases of diabetic retinopathy, a surgical procedure may be required to remove the vitreous, a gel-like fluid, in the back of the eye. You may be referred a retinal specialist if you experience a retinal detachment - the separation of the layer of light-sensitive tissue from

the layer of blood cells that provide it oxygen and nutrients. 

Ways to Help Prevent or Slow the Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

  • Compliance with your prescribed medication

  • Following a controlled diet

  • Exercising regularly

  • Avoid alcohol consumption and smoking

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy is a condition that may appear in people with diabetes. This condition progressively causes damage to the retina, the layer in the back of the eye that contains light-sensitive cells. If left untreated, this condition may lead to permanent damage to the eyes and cause blindness. The American Association of Ophthalmology recommends people with diabetes to have a comprehensive dilated exam once a year. Your ophthalmologist will recommend a plan based on the severity of your condition. 

Diabetes causes damage to small blood vessels throughout the body, including the retina. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when sugar blocks the blood in the vessels that lead to the retina, causing the vessels to leak fluid. This leakage causes the retinal tissue to swell, causing detrimental effects to the vision. Common symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are:

(212) 448-0101

©2020 by madisonophthalmology.